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  • Contains 7 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This workshop is designed to assist physical therapist education program administrators and faculty to obtain or maintain programmatic accreditation.

    This workshop is designed to assist physical therapist education program administrators and faculty to obtain or maintain programmatic accreditation. It includes an overview of the accreditation process and the specific expectations of the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) related to the Standards and Required Elements. Information is provided on:

    - Purposes and process of accreditation

    - How to develop a Self-Study Report that accurately reflects all program activities

    - How to respond to the accreditation reports 

    Learning Objectives:

    After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

    1. Describe the purposes of specialized programmatic accreditation

    2. Identify the individuals involved in the self-study process

    3. Identify pre-accreditation and accreditation activities

    4. Describe the self-study process

    Kevin K Chui

    PT, DPT, PhD

    Kevin, Term 1/1/19-12/31/22, holds a MS degree in Physical Therapy from Long Island University, and a PhD in Pathokinesiology from New York University and a DPT from Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions. He completed the APTA Fellowship in Education Leadership and the Regis University Fellowship in Manual Therapy.  Currently, Dr. Chui is Endowed Chair & Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy, Waldron College of Health and Human Services at Radford University in Roanoke, VA. He has been an on-site visitor for physical therapist programs since 2015. Dr. Chui serves on the PT Panel as physical therapist educator.

    Doreen Stiskal

    PhD, MS, PT

    Doreen holds a BS degree in Physical Therapy from Sargent College of Boston University, a MS in Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy with a minor in Education from Long Island University, and a PhD in Health Sciences with a specialization in Movement Science from Seton Hall University. She completed two fellowships, including the APTA Fellowship in Education Leadership. She is currently the manager for physical therapist programs, accreditation staff at APTA.  Dr. Stiskal was the chairperson of the Department of Physical Therapy, Seton Hall University, Nutley, NJ for almost 15 years. Previous experience includes academic leadership in physical therapist assistant as well as in post-professional health science education.  Amongst her many professional service activities, Dr. Stiskal recently completed two consecutive terms on the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education.

    Course Instructions

    1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recordings.
    2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
    3. Click Fill Out Survey under the Evaluation listing to provide valuable course feedback. Scroll down on all questions as there may be answer options that expand past the size of the window.
    4. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 

    Need Assistance?

    For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) states, “Personal mobility and independence are to be fostered by facilitating affordable personal mobility, training in mobility skills and access to mobility aids, devices, assistive technologies and live assistance.

    The United Nations Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) states, “Personal mobility and independence are to be fostered by facilitating affordable personal mobility, training in mobility skills and access to mobility aids, devices, assistive technologies and live assistance. According to the United States (US) Census, there are over 10 million Americans over the age of 65 who have difficulty with ambulation. This includes 3.3 million users of wheeled mobility devices, such asmanual and power wheelchairs and electric scooters, and 6.1 million users of ambulation aids, including canes, crutches, and walkers. Use of mobility devices increases with advanced age and has been found to be associated with non-white race/ethnicity, female sex, lower education level, greater co-morbidities, and obesity. The varying degrees of disability and unique requirements of each individual leave many providers and users with the difficult task of determining the best AD to both enhance function and promote safety.

    Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT, GCS

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify and discuss determinants to mobility and apply world health organization, international classification of functioning, disability and health framework (ICF) framework to equipment and seating assessment, recommendation, and prescription
    2. Identify, describe, and differentiate various assistive devices (ADs) and adaptive equipment and determine appropriate assessment, prescription, and maintenance
    3. Discuss orthoses commonly utilized by older adults
    4. Identify, describe, and differentiate various wheeled mobility options and determine appropriate assessment, prescription, and maintenance for the older adult population
    5. Identify and describe the roles of interprofessional team members involved in equipment and seating process
    6. Discuss and explain issues related to funding and appropriate documentation and prescription of equipment and seating
    7. Synthesize knowledge of device prescription via case studies

    Laura Driscoll

    PT, DPT, GCS

    Dr. Driscoll received her Bachelor of Science in Health Studies and Master of Science in Physical Therapy from Boston University, as well as her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the MGH Institute of Health Professions. Since 2001, she has worked with Beth Israwl Deaconess Medical Center in Boston as an acute care physical therapist. In 2014, she transitioned to academia full time as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the DPT program at Boston University, while maintaining active per diem status at BIDMC. She is the primary instructor of Clinical Medicine and the DPT Academic Practicum experiences, as well as assisting in the Cardiopulmonary laboratory and Comprehensive Clinical Reasoning course. She presents yearly at Boston University as well as Simmons College on delirium and early mobility in the ICU. Sheholds an additional role at BU as the Director of Faculty Diversity and Inclusion for the College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College and is currently pursuing a PhD in Gerontology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

    Erin Riley

    PT, DPT, NCS

    Dr. Riley received her Bachelor of Science in Health Studies (2002) and Master of Science in Physical Therapy (2004) from Boston University, as well as her Doctorate in Physical Therapy (2007) from the MGH Institute of Health Professions. Since 2007, she has practiced at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Charlestown, MA as an inpatient rehabilitation physical therapist. After 2 years on the physical therapy faculty at the MGH Institute of Health Professions,she joined the Boston University physical therapy faculty in 2014 as a Clinical Assistant Professor and co-Director of Clinical Education. Her areas of clinical expertise include traumatic brain injury, disorders of consciousness, and complex neurological diagnoses. She is a co-author of the APTA PTNow Guillain-Barre Syndrome clinical summary and has also presented in the areas of utilizing social media and technology to bridge the classroom and clinical environments.

    Course Instructions

    1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
    2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
    3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


      Need Assistance?

      For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

      • Register
        • Non-Member - $200
        • PT Member - $120
        • PTA Member - $120
        • Student - $120
        • Post-Professional Student - $120
        • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
      • More Information
    1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

      The obesity epidemic that has plagued United States has now become pandemic, affecting all ages,including older adults.

      The obesity epidemic that has plagued United States has now become pandemic, affecting all ages,including older adults. In most practice settings,physical therapists who treat older adults will examine and treat patients with the co-morbidity of obesity. The implications of obesity on every system of the body and the functional consequences will be discussed.Weight stigmatization will be briefly reviewed as it relates to clinical practice. Case studies will be used to cover examination, and treatment modifications in various practice settings.

      Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT, GCS

      Learning Objectives:

      1. describe the prevalence and impact of obesity in older adults on health care.
      2. explain concepts of obesity development and the relationship of obesity to other diseases.
      3. adapt the physical therapy examination and interventions for patients who are obese.
      4. identify resources needed and available for clinical practice with patients who are obese.
      5. evaluate various tests and measures appropriate in the assessment of patients with obesity via case studies.
      6. synthesize information to develop comprehensive physical therapy plans for different practice settings and make appropriate referrals utilizing case scenarios.

      Jane Killough

      PT, MS, GCS

      Dr. Killough is an Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at the College of St. Scholastic in Duluth, MN,where she is responsible for content related to physiology of exercise and injury, geriatrics, multiple system conditions,screening, and acute care physical therapy. Her 18 years of clinical practice has encompassed patient rehabilitation, acute care, and home care. Dr. Killough attained her Doctor of Physical Therapy from Simmons College, Master of Arts in Physical Therapy from TheCollege of Saint Scholastic, Master of Science in Physical Therapy from the Pennsylvania State University, and her Bachelor of Arts from the Carleton College.

      Course Instructions

      1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
      2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
      3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


        Need Assistance?

        For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

        • Register
          • Non-Member - $200
          • PT Member - $120
          • PTA Member - $120
          • Student - $120
          • Post-Professional Student - $120
          • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
        • More Information
      1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

        Rehabilitation for patients who are approaching their end of life poses complex clinical, ethical, and legal challenges for physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs).

        Rehabilitation for patients who are approaching their end of life poses complex clinical, ethical, and legal challenges for physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs). The most serious of these challenges may include participation in difficult end-of-life decisions related to initiating or continuing life support and withholding or withdrawing medical treatment. Although therapists are not typically the primary healthcare professionals involved in making these decisions, they are part of the professional healthcare team, and have an obligation to support the patient, family, and healthcare professionals when patients are faced with making these decisions.

        Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT, GCS

        Learning Objectives:

        Upon completion of this monograph, the course participant will be able to:

        1. identify major legal and ethical issues in providing end-of-life care.

        2. describe major milestones that facilitated changes in the provision of end-of-life care in the us.

        3. explain the significance and implications in the use of advance directives.

        4. describe the role and authority of surrogates in end-of-life decision-making.

        5. define the difference between substituted judgment and best interest standard used by surrogate decision-makers and discuss the implications of each standard.

        6. differentiate competence from capacity.

        7. explain and differentiate the purpose of hospice and palliative care.

        8. discuss ethical concerns in end-of-life care provided in nursing homes.

        9. discuss the effectiveness of codes of ethics in guiding decision-making for therapists.

        10. integrate concepts of various ethical theories to end-of-life care.

        11. describe the impact of religion and spirituality on end-of-life care.

        Mary Ann Wharton

        PT, MS

        Ms. Wharton is currently an independent Physical Therapy Consultant and holds adjunct faculty positions in the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Geriatric Residency program and in the PTA program at Allegheny County Community College, Boyce Campus, Monroeville, PA. Previously, she served as faculty in Physical Therapy programs at Saint Francis University, Slippery Rock University, and the University of Pittsburgh. She is a physical therapy graduate of Ithaca College, and received a Master of Science degree in Leadership, with an emphasis in Geriatric Physical Therapy from the University of Pittsburgh. She is currently the Chair of the Pennsylvania Physical Therapy Association’s(PPTA) Ethics Committee; Chair of the PPTA Geriatric Special Interest Group; Public Liaison for the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy’s Cognitive and Mental Health Special Interest Group; and a member of the Editorial Advisory Group for PT in Motion.

        Ms. Wharton has authored book chapters addressing geriatric and ethical issues in physical therapy including: “Environmental Design: Accommodating Sensory Changes in the Elderly” in Geriatric Physical Therapy, 3rd edition; “Enhancing Professional Accountability: Inquiry into the Work of a Health Profession’s Ethics Committee,” in Educating for Moral Action: A Sourcebook in Health and Rehabilitation Ethics; and “Ethics” in Geriatric Rehabilitation Manual, 3rd edition. She recently submitted a chapter, “Ethical Issues in the Rehabilitation of Geriatric Patients” for publication in the upcoming book, Rehabilitation Ethics for Interprofessional Practice. She has also published over 40articles on ethics in various publications, including the PPTA Newsletter, GeriNotes, and Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation, and has served as an invited speaker on geriatrics and ethics topics for APTA’s Ethics and Judicial Committee, APTA’s Combined Sections Meetings, and at PPTA Chapter meetings.

        Course Instructions

        1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
        2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
        3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


          Need Assistance?

          For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

          • Register
            • Non-Member - $200
            • PT Member - $120
            • PTA Member - $120
            • Student - $120
            • Post-Professional Student - $120
            • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
          • More Information
        1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

          Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a strong increase in the risk of physical disability in mobility,instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and activities of daily living (ADL) domains.

          Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with a strong increase in the risk of physical disability in mobility,instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and activities of daily living (ADL) domains. Individuals with diabetes age 60 years old or older are 2 to 3 times more likely to report an inability to walk 1/4 mile, ambulate on stairs, perform household duties, or require the use of a mobility aid when compared to aged matched persons without diabetes. Unfortunately,the frequent consequence of inadequately managed diabetic foot complications is lower extremity (LE)amputation. In fact, people with diabetes are 13 times more likely to have an amputation than people without DM. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 45% to 85% of nontraumatic LE amputations in the United States (U.S.)attributable to diabetes could have been avoided with comprehensive diabetic foot care programs.

          Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT, GCS

          Learning Objectives:

          1. describe common foot limitations of structure and function associated with diabetes mellitus (DM).
          2. explain the components of a comprehensive foot assessment for the patient with diabetes mellitus.
          3. integrate the results of the physical therapy examination and evaluation to develop a physical therapy management plan.
          4. describe the features and prescription of shoes, insoles and foot orthotics for patients with diabetes mellitus.

          Nancy K. Shipe

          PT, DPT, OCS

          Dr. Shipe is an Associate Professor at Slippery Rock University in the Graduate School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock, PA.This is complimented by her ongoing commitment to clinical practice at WESTARM Physical Therapy, Lower Burrell, PA. Dr. Shipe has taught and published previously on the diabetic foot.Her special interests are PT management of foot and ankle dysfunction especially related to diabetes, prescription of footwear, and manual therapy. Dr. Shipe is actively engaged in professional activities and regularly represents the Pennsylvania Chapter in the APTA House of Delegates. She was the recipient of the Pennsylvania Chapter’s Humanitarian Award in 2016 for her ongoing commitment to serve others at all levels from providing shoes for the homeless to teaching and caring for patients in the developing nations of St. Lucia and Peru. Dr. Shipe is dedicated to the advancement of our profession through her teaching students, colleagues, patients, and families; excellence in clinical practice; outreach to those in need; and support to our professional association.

          Course Instructions

          1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
          2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
          3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


            Need Assistance?

            For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

            • Register
              • Non-Member - $200
              • PT Member - $120
              • PTA Member - $120
              • Student - $120
              • Post-Professional Student - $120
              • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
            • More Information
          1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

            Successful aging is hard to define, yet it is something that each person hopes to achieve.

            Successful aging is hard to define, yet it is something that each person hopes to achieve. This monograph will explore various models and theories of health, illness, and disability as they apply to the older adult and physical therapy practice. The biopsychosocial dimensions of successful aging will be discussed with an emphasis on the role of the physical therapist to support longevity and contribute to an older adult’s freedom from disability and disease. The second part of this monograph explores environmental dimensions of successful aging and the role of the physical therapist in reference to financial security, housing options, adaptive equipment/technology, leisure activities and social networks. Case studies illustrate how physical therapists have the knowledge and skills to assist patients or clients in adapting to their changing circumstances, whether that is through primary prevention and risk reduction measures, direct interventions, advocacy in public policy, or consultation.

            Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT, GCS

            Learning Objectives:

            Upon completion of this monograph, the course participant will be able to:

            1. define successful aging from a biophychosocial and lifespan developmental perspective.

            2. discuss factors that appear to contribute to longevity and freedom from disease/disability as they relate to successful aging.

            3. explain how physical therapists may promote longevity via physical activity, exercise, and environmental adaptations.

            4. discuss the role of the physical therapist in primary and secondary prevention and risk reduction across practice patterns.

            5. explain various housing options, including home modification, available to older adults.

            6. discuss how physical therapists can make their communities better places for aging individuals as it pertains to home and work environments.

            7. given a case scenario, address relevant biopsychosocial and environmental adaptations that promote successful aging across settings and activities.

            Mary Thompson

            PT, PhD, GCS

            Dr. Thompson is the Director of Post Professional Programs and professor at the School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman’s University, Dallas. She is a native Floridian and completed her undergraduate degree in physical therapy from the University of Kentucky, followed by her advanced masters in geriatric physical therapy from Texas Woman’s University. Dr. Thompson later completed her PhD in higher education with a minor in aging studies from the University of North Texas. She has been a physical therapist for 37 years.

            Clinically, Dr. Thompson has worked primarily in home health with time in skilled nursing facilities and hospice. She is an American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS) Board Certified Clinical Specialist in Geriatrics. In the professional program at Texas Woman’s, Dr. Thompson teaches health promotion and wellness courses using a service-learning model and teaches in the professional management course sequence. In the post professional program, she collaborated with others to develop the curriculum for the Baylor-TWU Women’s Health Residency program and the Academic Certificate in Geriatric Physical Therapy. Dr. Thompson teaches PhD students how higher education institutions work and the roles of faculty and department heads. She enjoys mentoring PhD students in both qualitative and quantitative research methods.

            Course Instructions

            1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
            2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
            3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


              Need Assistance?

              For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

              • Register
                • Non-Member - $200
                • PT Member - $120
                • PTA Member - $120
                • Student - $120
                • Post-Professional Student - $120
                • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
              • More Information
            1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

              Vestibular disorders affect many older adults, the most common one being benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

              Vestibular disorders affect many older adults, the most common one being benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Symptoms of dizziness and imbalance can negatively impact the mobility of older adults and cause fear of falling, leading to disability and poor quality of life. Physical therapy can significantly improve the lives of older adults living with vestibular disorders. This monograph aims to educate physical therapists working with older adults about common vestibular disorders that affect older adults, the examination process and evidence-based outcome measures utilized for assessing older adult patients with known or possible vestibular disorders, and the rationale and expected outcomes of the application of vestibular rehabilitation interventions in older adults.

              Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT, GCS

              Learning Objectives:

              Upon completion of this monograph, the course participant will be able to:

              1. Describe the changes to the vestibular system due to normal aging.
              2. Compare and contrast the pathophysiology of common disorders of the vestibular system.
              3. Differentiate between signs and symptoms caused by peripheral versus central vestibular pathology.
              4. Recognize and interpret abnormal findings\non vestibular function, oculomotor, and vestibulo-ocular tests.
              5. Select and interpret evidence-based outcome measures for assessment of gait and balance in older adults with vestibular disorders.
              6. Analyze the results of positional testing to determine the location and type of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).
              7. Synthesize the subjective and objective findings of the physical therapy examination to select the appropriate vestibular rehabilitation interventions for an older adult with dizziness and imbalance.
              8. Discuss the physical therapy goals and expected outcomes of vestibular rehabilitation in the older adult.
              9. Integrate knowledge of the physical therapy management of vestibular disorders in older adults through case studies.

              Anne Kloos

              PT, PhD, NCS

              Dr. Kloos received her physical therapy degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her doctoral degree in biology/neuroscience from Cleveland State University. Dr. Kloos is currently a Professor Clinical in the Physical Therapy Division at the Ohio State University where she teaches adult neurorehabilitation and neuroscience courses. This is coupled by Dr. Kloos’ research on balance and gait interventions in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and Huntington’s disease. She is a board certified neurologic physical therapy specialist and has over 25 years of clinical experience. She presently serves as Co-Director of the Ohio State University Neurologic Physical Therapy Residency Program and Associate Editor of the Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy. Previously she served as Chair of the Degenerative Diseases Special Interest Group and of the Neurologic Residency Curriculum Task Force for the American Physical Therapy Association.

              Deborah Kegelmeyer

              PT, DPT, MS, GCS

              Dr. Kegelmeyer is a Professor Clinical in the Physical Therapy Division at The Ohio State University. She is aboard certified geriatric physical therapist and teaches geriatric and neurologic rehabilitation courses. Dr. Kegelmeyer’s research is focused on determining optimal methods for measuring clinical progress in older adults and clients with neurodegenerative disorders and on treatments to improve walking and balance in these clients. She served as the chair of the Parkinson Disease EDGE task force for the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy and is past secretary of the Degenerative Disease Special Interest Group. She obtained her physical therapy and masters of allied medicine degrees at The Ohio State University and her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree at Massachusetts General Hospital, Institute of Health Professions. She is the co-director of the Mobility and Exercise in Neurodegenerative Disease (MEND) lab.

              Course Instructions

              1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
              2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
              3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


                Need Assistance?

                For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

                • Register
                  • Non-Member - $200
                  • PT Member - $120
                  • PTA Member - $120
                  • Student - $120
                  • Post-Professional Student - $120
                  • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
                • More Information
              1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

                Osteoarthritis (OA) affects the individual and society. According to the Arthritis Foundation, in 2017 OA was the most common type of arthritis affecting more than 30.8 million people.

                Osteoarthritis (OA) affects the individual and society. According to the Arthritis Foundation, in 2017 OA was the most common type of arthritis affecting more than 30.8 million people. Physical therapists improve mobility, educate patients, manage pain symptoms, and prepare for self-management of people living with OA. This Home Study Course will inform clinical diagnosis and physical management of osteoarthritic conditions affecting the extremities. We will discuss issues concerning pathoanatomy, biomechanics, clinical examination, and evidence informed interventions. The examination will follow the Patient Client Management Model using language housed in the International Classification of Function (ICF) framework. We will consider social determinants of health (SDoH) within the patient examination along with task analysis of movement. The Home Study Course will address differential diagnosis followed by a case example. The multiple-choice post-monograph questions will test reader’s knowledge.

                Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT

                Learning Objectives:

                Upon completion of this home study course, the course participant will be able to:

                1. Describe the incidence and impact of osteoarthritis (OA).

                2. Integrate the international classification of function (ICF) model and social determinants of health (SDOH) into the physical therapy examination as it relates to OA.

                3. Diagnose pathological findings clinically and radiographically.

                4. Discuss the movement system analysis as it relates to patients with OA.

                5. Define primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention.

                6. Integrate evidence informed practice into the clinical examination.

                7. Utilize patient reported outcome measures, functional tests, and clinical examination tools to case scenarios.

                8. Apply exercise principles from the american college of sports medicine and world health organization to people living with OA.

                9. Synthesize examination findings relative to the management of OA.

                Susan Wenker

                PT, PhD, GCS Emeritus

                Dr. Wenker received her BS at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and her Masters and PhD degrees at the University of Wisconsin-Madison through the School of Education. Dr. Wenker currently teaches the professional seminar series and foundational skills course in the UW-Madison DPT program. Additionally, she teaches the Credentialed Clinical Instructor Course, Advanced Credentialed Exercise Expert for Aging Adult course, is the Director of Education for APTA Geriatrics, and serves on multiple campus committees for teaching, leadership, and interprofessional programming. 

                Colleen Cobey

                PT, MS, Ex Phys

                Colleen received her BS from Ohio University, her Masters in Exercise Physiology from Ohio University, and completed an orthopedic manual physical therapy residency at Kaiser Permanente. She currently teaches foundational skills courses in the UW-Madison DPT program and also has a clinical appointment at University Health Services.

                Course Instructions

                1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
                2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
                3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


                  Need Assistance?

                  For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

                  • Register
                    • Non-Member - $200
                    • PT Member - $120
                    • PTA Member - $120
                    • Student - $120
                    • Post-Professional Student - $120
                    • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
                  • More Information
                1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

                  The domain of mental health and illness are new frontiers for many physical therapy clinicians, researchers, and academics.

                  The domain of mental health and illness are new frontiers for many physical therapy clinicians, researchers, and academics. Physical Therapists (PTs) must be adequately informed of the intertwining nature of different domains of health and health care services in order to effectively and efficiently provide person-centered care. This monograph highlights the concepts of emotional well-being, emotional distress, mental health, mental illness, and mental disorders. Discussed in detail are common anxiety disorders and depressive disorders in older adults, and co-morbid substance use disorders, particularly alcohol misuse and abuse.  Several health care treatment approaches (e.g., the medical approach, the psychologically informed practice approach, and the strength based approach), and considerations and implications for physical therapy, will be covered.

                  Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT, GCS

                  Learning Objectives:

                  Upon completion of this monograph, the course participant will be able to:

                  1. Describe the importance of mental health and mental illness in older adults for physical therapists and physical therapist assistants (pta).

                  2. Define and differentiate the terms mental health, mental illness, mental disorder, emotional well-being, emotional distress, anxiety, depression, and alcohol use disorder.

                  3. Utilize evidence-based screening tests to assess for characteristics of anxiety, depression, or substance misuse/abuse.

                  4. Compare and contrast the benefits and limitations of the medical approach and strength-based assessment approaches for the older adult experiencing one or more mental disorders.

                  5. Incorporate mental health care concepts into physical therapy triage assessment and treatment interventions for supporting people living with and impacted by anxiety, depressive and/or alcohol use disorders.

                  Lise McCarthy

                  PT, DPT

                  Lise is a Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Geriatric Physical Therapy since 2003. As a private practitioner at McCarthy’s Interactive Physical Therapy, Inc., San Francisco, CA, she emphasizes the comprehensive examination and treatment of the people impacted by movement-related impairments and limitations affected by multiple health domains (i.e., behavioral, ognitive, functional, mental, physical). She is an Assistant Clinical Professor, Volunteer Faculty member at the University of California at San Francisco, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science. From 2014 to 2019 McCarthy served as the Founding Chair of the Cognitive and Mental Health Special Interest Group where she focused her efforts on collaborating with other similarly minded physical therapists and physical therapist assistants in publishing multi-media materials (e.g. peer-reviewed and clinical articles, assistant editor and guest editor of GeriNotes, national lectures, PTNow Test and Measures, poster presentations.) For her exceptional service and commitment to the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy, she received the 2018 Presidents award. She has worked with researchers and developers at UCSF, Samuel Merritt University, and In-Step Mobility. She has also delivered multiple local, state, and national talks, in addition to workshops and videos on topics related to cognitive and mental health, fall risk, and pain.

                  Nicole Dawnson

                  PT, PhD

                  Dr. Dawson is a Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Geriatric Physical Therapy and an Assistant Professor in the Division of Physical Therapy at the University of Central Florida and Co-Director of the Innovative Mobility Initiative (IMOVE™) Lab. She graduated from Ohio University with a Master of Arts degree in Physical Therapy in 2002. Dr. Dawson is a Board Certified Geriatric Physical Therapist (2014) with over 17 years of clinical experience along with a PhD in Adult Development and Aging Psychology from Cleveland State University. She has been recognized for excellence in teaching by the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy through receipt of the Distinguished Educator Award and the American Physical Therapy Association being awarded the Margaret L. Moore Outstanding New Academic Faculty Award. She currently serves the geriatric community as the chair of the American Board of the Physical Therapy Specialties Geriatric Specialty Council, as well as through involvement with the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy. Her current areas of research include: developing non-pharmacological interventions to improve functional and psychosocial outcomes in older adults with chronic disease including those with dementia, identifying predictors of falls and gait disorders in older adults, as well as gaining a better understanding of the disability experience. Dr. Dawson has been published in peer-reviewed journals including The Gerontologist and the Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy. She has presented at numerous international and national conferences on the subject of geriatric rehabilitation. She is passionate about bettering the treatment and care of older adults and is dedicated to assisting students and clinicians in gaining skills and knowledge to better help their patients maximize their potential. 

                  Course Instructions

                  1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
                  2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
                  3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


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                      • Student - $120
                      • Post-Professional Student - $120
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                  1. Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

                    Normal age-related changes in the integumentary system put older adults at risk for skin compromise.

                    Normal age-related changes in the integumentary system put older adults at risk for skin compromise. Years of accumulated environmental exposure, social factors, and the presence of chronic disease also puts this population at higher risk for skin breakdown. Painful, open wounds, especially those associated with chronic disease, can have a profoundly negative impact on the quality of life of older adults, including reduced mobility, loss of independence, and life-threatening infection. This monograph aims to educate physical therapists in the examination, evaluation, and intervention of wound etiologies common in the elderly population. Information regarding early screening for risk factors and prevention strategies are also emphasized.

                    Editor: Barbara Billek-Sawhney, PT, EdD, DPT

                    Learning Objectives:

                    Upon completion of this home study course, the course participant will be able to:

                    1. Describe normal age-related changes in the skin and describe how these changes place older adults at risk for open wounds and slower healing.

                    2. Summarize the phases of normal wound healing and how these phases may be negatively impacted by advanced age.

                    3. Recognize complicating factors common in the elderly population that can negatively impact healing potential.

                    4. Recall the components of wound examination and how each should be performed.

                    5. Identify signs and symptoms of local and systemic infection.

                    6. Compare and contrast various methods of wound debridement to include advantages, disadvantages, and contraindications.

                    7. Describe different methods of wound irrigation and when to use antiseptics.

                    8. Discuss how specific biophysical agents may be utilized to promote improved healing in elderly patients.

                    9. Select topicals and wound dressings capable of managing an optimal healing environment for wounds with various characteristics.

                    10. Apply examination, evaluation, intervention, and prevention processes to specific wound etiologies common in the elderly.

                    11. Select evidence-based classification systems and outcome measures for specific wound etiologies.

                    12. Discuss the importance of interdisciplinary care to optimize wound healing in the elderly.

                    13. Explain how patient culture may impact examination, intervention, and prevention.

                    14. Integrate physical therapy integumentary knowledge through a case study example of an older patient with an open wound.

                    Karen A. Gibbs

                    PT, PhD, DPT, CWS

                    Dr. Gibbs received her entry-level Master of Science in Physical Therapy (1999) and Transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy (2003) degrees from the University of the Pacific. She was certified by the American Board of Wound Management as a Certified Wound Specialist in 2001 and completed her PhD in Adult Education at Texas State University in 2011. Dr. Gibbs has practiced as a physical therapist in outpatient, skilled nursing, and acute care settings. She is currently a Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Texas State University where she teaches wound management and examination techniques and lectures in structural anatomy, pathophysiology, and therapeutic interventions. Dr. Gibbs is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and currently serves as President of the Academy of Clinical Electrophysiology and Wound Management (ACEWM) section. She is also a member of the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC) and a past member, international educator, and clinician with Health Volunteers Overseas. 

                    Deborah M. Wendland

                    PT, DPT, PhD, CPed

                    Dr. Wendland received her entry-level Master of Science in Physical Therapy (1996) and Post-Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy (2006) degrees from Washington University in St. Louis. She is certified in Pedorthics through the American Board for Certification in Orthotics Prosthetics and Pedorthics. She completed her PhD in Applied Physiology at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013. Dr. Wendland has practiced as a physical therapist in acute care, skilled nursing, outpatient, and home health care settings. She currently volunteers leading a Diabetic Foot Clinic for underserved individuals in Atlanta, GA. She is an Associate Professor at Mercer University in the Department of Physical Therapy where she teaches health promotion and wellness, foundational sciences of the musculoskeletal system, and integumentary care. Her areas of research include health promotion in people with diabetes as well as wound healing and skin re-loading in people with diabetes. Dr. Wendland is a member of the APTA and serves as the Section Program Chair for the ACEWM. She also serves on the Clinical Practice Guideline team for Diabetic Foot Ulcers through the ACEWM.

                    Course Instructions

                    1. Click on the Contents tab to watch the course recording.
                    2. Click the Take Quiz button to complete the assessment. Learners will have 3 attempts to pass and must answer at least 70% of questions correctly.
                    3. Click the View/Print Your Certificate button under the Certificate listing. You can view/print your certificate at any time by visiting the APTA Learning Center and clicking the CEU Certificate/Transcript link on the left-hand side of the page. 


                      Need Assistance?

                      For assistance logging in, accessing activities, claiming credit, or for other questions or concerns, please e-mail learningcenter@apta.org. 

                      • Register
                        • Non-Member - $200
                        • PT Member - $120
                        • PTA Member - $120
                        • Student - $120
                        • Post-Professional Student - $120
                        • *Further discounts may apply once you log in.
                      • More Information